Thursday, January 13, 2022

Spooner's Cove Arch

 I read an article in the paper recently titled "Beloved coastal arch falls in storms." The subtitle states "Locals lament the loss of rock formation, a landmark since at least the 1870's." It's an arch I remember well from a vacation we took to the area about 1.5 years ago. You can read my original post here.

Here's a pano shot I took using my cell phone. The natural beauty of Spooner's Cove in Montana de Oro State Park is stunning! The arch is (was) way over on the right side, and can't be seen in this photo. Let's go take a closer look...

Lilly leading the way down to the beach. We didn't know about the arch, so you can imagine our surprise and pleasure when we "discovered" it!

We had to cross some water if we wanted to climb under the arch. Lilly proceeds with caution! The geology of the arch is interesting. The rock is thrusting upward, and has kind of a flagstone appearance. Very different from the desert arches I'm used to seeing!

Lilly took this one of me.



I later learned that the best time to photograph this arch is at high tide, when you can get some beautiful reflections off the water. The photo below is a great example (photo credit: LA Road Trip issue, Baltimore Sun).

Here's a photo from the internet from a few days ago of where the arch used to be. Kind of sad.
I feel extremely fortunate to have been able to enjoy it and photograph it before its collapse. Fond memories!!
  
Linking with Skywatch Friday.
Thanks for stopping by!!

41 comments:

  1. That is sad. A tragedy. It must have been a terrible storm.

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  2. Archese are beautiful. I don't really understand how they stand up with a big hollow but I'm glad you saw it in person. Sad loss.

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  3. ...never put off taking a picture!

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  4. Oh so sad! What a shame to lose it.

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  5. So sad! It's a beautiful place still!

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  6. Beautiful sky. Beautiful scenery.

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  7. How cool and beautiful setting! The opening almost looks like a heart sideways! Also neat you see your grand daughter again! Am sure you had a great time with her:)

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  8. Dearest Peter,
    You and cute Lilly have been very lucky in capturing it the way you both did.
    One never knows how Mother Nature can attack Earth in a destructive way.
    Hugs,
    Mariette

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  9. Sort of a busman's holiday for you. The same but different. Very nicely constructed post. Thank you

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  10. Beautiful first pic!
    Wonderful arch, but.... the Mini-Mouse-hat-person steals the show a bit.
    Oh, I can´t wait to see the masks being gone. One day soon, huh.

    Wow on the reflection!
    And really a sad sight of the missing arch.
    Glad you were there in time to share this beauty.

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  11. Wieder großartig Fotos einer atemberaubenden Gegend !
    Liebe Grüße

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  12. Hello,
    The first photo of the cove is lovely. Your arch photos are beautiful. It is sad the arch has fallen. Take care, enjoy your day! Have a happy weekend!

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  13. A pity that that arch is gone but we still get a good view of it thanks to your photo's. That reflection photo is indeed a beauty.

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  14. That's what happens with arches, but somewhere there's another one forming as a result of those very same forces that destroyed your arch. Someday, when Lily's an old lady, she may be the only person who remembers that once there was an arch at Spooner's Cove.

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  15. Amazing sights beautifully captured.

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  16. What a pity that that beautiful arch has since been swept away. Anyway, Lilly can say she was one of the last to take a picture of it. And not only that, the photo also shows Grandpa proudly posing with the arch.
    - greetings from the Netherlands.

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  17. I went to NPR and read a story about Spooner's Arch. What a shame, but it is part of the natural erosion and buildup cycle. Here in the East, we lost a famed New Hampshire rock formation called the Old Man in the Mountain about 20 years ago; it was even on their license plate, as I recall.

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  18. How sad that the arch is gone. But always a delight to see Lilly on your blog. And your headerphoto -- what can I say, every time I come here, I'm amazed at the beauty of the desert.

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  19. Oh what a beautiful arch and great photos that you have since it is now gone ~ Good to see Lily again too ~ Xo

    Wishing you happy moments,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  20. I saw a news story about some folks who had defaced petroglyphs and thought of you. Thoughtless? Ignorant?

    "A panel of ancient petroglyphs at Big Bend National Park in Texas has been “irreparably damaged” by vandals who etched a series of names into the rock, the National Park Service has announced.

    The additions crudely obscure a series of swirling, abstract designs believed to have been created by Native peoples between 4,000 and 8,500 years ago. The Park Service said in a news release that even though staff members have already treated the vandalized rock, “much of the damage is, unfortunately, permanent.”"

    -from https://news.artnet.com/art-world/vandals-irreparably-damaged-rock-art-2058101

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    1. Unfortunately, that's a story that's all too common. Just can't understand the ignorance of some people. Adds to the argument in favor of keeping these sites secret or fenced off. So unfortunate.

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  21. It happens I am afraid, we had a famous one collapse along the coast a while ago. Looks like yours succumb to erosion

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  22. beautiful - And Amazing - BUT, not so surprising that YOU are able to share with us - because . . being friends with the earth in a very special way . . . you'd already collected this - Thank you, Thank you for sharing - πŸ’™

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  23. Lilly is capably walking in your footsteps in more than one way! So glad you both had the opportunity to explore this before Nature exerted her forces!

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  24. There is some solace in the fact that the same forces that made the arch over thousands of years, also took it. That was the inevitable outcome--- We can miss it, but those of us who saw it before it fell can feel privileged.

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  25. So sad that the beautiful arch is no more. Glad you took some lovely shots of the arch to share with us. The one with the reflection in the water is beautiful. Have a great weekend.

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  26. Great place to explore. Thanks for the post

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  27. Sad that the arch has collapsed but you have photos of it to keep the memory alive. The refection photo is really beautiful. Thanks for sharing.

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  28. Oh my, that is sad. You are so lucky to have seen it and photographed it so beautifully.

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  29. Lucky that no one was injured when the arch collapsed. Beautiful photos, not only of the arch, but your header sunset is amazing.

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  30. That's too bad, geology in action I guess. Luckily you got some great photos.

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  31. Very interesting before and after shots.

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  32. Oh, I hate that it is gone...but so glad you got to see it before.

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  33. Sad that it's gone but I'm so glad you were able to see it and preserve in photos, it was beautiful.

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  34. It's always a sad day when wonderful bits of nature succumb to the water. We had one that disappeared a few years ago, too. And it sure makes you grateful for all the photos you took!

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  35. Oh no! That is Mother Nature's and humans' loss too. It was beautiful.

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  36. Oh my goodness bittersweet memories for sure. Wonderful you have pictures to preserve the arch forever.

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  37. No Way - Didn't Hear About Its Collapse - What A Bummer - And So Stoked You And The Family Have Those Memories - Way Cool - Be Well Brother Parts

    Cheers

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  38. It is sad that beautiful arch collapsed but I guess it was a matter of fragility of composition and weather and time. We feel the same way about seeing the once famous "Old Man of the Mountain" natural rock face in New Hampshire that is featured on the New Hampshire state quarter coin. It fell down a couple years after we viewed it on a vacation trip.

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