Thursday, May 27, 2021

Johnny Lang Mine: The Hike Back!

Thank goodness, the return hike from Johnny Lang Mine (where I left you hanging on my last post) is mostly downhill. It's a very hot day, and with all the hiking and climbing, my legs feel like noodles. When legs get overly tired, they stop obeying commands from the brain. From past experience, I know downhill injuries and especially end of hike injuries are by far the most common. Trip and fall, sprained/twisted ankles and related bad outcomes are always lurking, so I remind myself to slow down, rest often, and FOCUS on each and every step. One step at a time, right?
 
We'll say adios to the Johnny Lang Mine and begin the return hike.

Does anyone else see "sleeping rock"??

How about bird stick?

I thought I found a pottery sherd but it was just a rock 😕

Heart-shaped rock

What the heck??

I come across this survey marker out in the middle of nowhere. I guess back in the day, the government had to survey the country and they did it with these markers. I don't see a date on this one, but a quick Google search tells me the US General Land Office (GLO) was renamed BLM in 1946, so this survey must be pre-1946. GLO has been around since 1849, so this marker could be really old. Any idea what that slash is across the top of the marker? Here, this will help...
That slash aligns perfectly with the N/S axis!

A large critter burrow of some kind. I thought it might be a tortoise burrow, but the top of the opening isn't shaped right. Tortoise burrows usually are more domed-shaped, conforming to the shape of their shell. This is probably a fox burrow, but that's just a guess.
 

The sun is low on the horizon, the shadows are long, the the light is golden. My favorite time of the day! I'll just stop yacking and share a few more photos now that we're almost back to the Jeep.
 









The Gaia GPS app on my phone tells me I hiked 7.6 miles, and I climbed a little over 1000' in elevation. A pretty good accomplishment on a very hot day, but to be honest, it felt longer than that, and with more of a climb. I decided to check my Garmin GPS to confirm the numbers. They should be identical. They were turned on and off at exactly the same time and same location.
 


Hmm, that's weird. My Garmin tells me I hiked a mile further (8.6 miles) with an ascent of 1368'. That explains why I'm totally exhausted, but it doesn't explain why the big difference between Gaia and Garmin?? If anyone out there has any insight, I'm all ears!!
 
Thanks for joining me on another desert adventure!!
Linking with Skywatch Friday.



51 comments:

  1. Well either 7.6 or 8.6 miles is a big distance in such rough country.
    When my Dad worked in Utah he would take me and my brother sometimes out in the boonies to confirm the locations of the markers. Them surveyors went all over the place.

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  2. A beautiful but unforgiving landscape.

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  3. That stove on #11 is nice find. You didn´t took it with you? Would make great fireplace. And the scenery on the next one is great. I love the trail, wouldn´t mind bicycling there. As long it isn´t too hot. And I still admire your stamina, I couldn´t do that.

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  4. ...there is NO WAY that I could make this hike, so I thank you for taking be along. Once in a great while I find survey markers now with GPS they have because relics of the past. Thanks my friend.

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  5. Glad you didn't get injured on the way back. How does each app track your distance? Because the method might be the reason for the difference. If one tracks you via a map and then measures from the map and the other adds up your steps and figures it that way... Just a thought.

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    1. I think you're right, Liz. It's got to be something like that. I Googled it and learned that if you are hiking in a straight line or gentle curves on flat terrain, they are all fairly accurate. When you go up and down over boulders, lots of elevation change, and lots of zig-zig hiking to avoid obstacles (my typical hike), accuracy goes out the window, and some GPS devices are more accurate than others.

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  6. So glad to see you made it back!

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  7. Dearest Peter,
    Loved that 'yawning' sleeping rock photo!
    You have been brave for going there, a long hike and not without any dangers.
    Hugs,
    Mariette

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  8. Amazing pictures. I think this is my first visit. Doesn’t doesn’t look like a place where I would want to hike.Love the lighting at the end of the day. Thanks for sharing. Stay safe

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  9. Greetings and Salutations! Sleeping Rock, yep. Heart shaped rock, yeppers. But that stove in the middle of no where, jeepers. To discover that Survey Marker was just totally awesome. Glad you made it back safe and sound.

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  10. Beautiful pictures. The down treks can be nasty if one looses control

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  11. Yep! Uphill I manage but not down! I once started... crying cause I was so exhausted and terrified to fall.

    Oh, the rock is sleeping and dreaming for sure. "Cute". And the stick! A heart, did you take it or leave it for someone else?
    Interesting marker.

    Wonderful light in the pictures. Do you sell those (please say no, I have no space anyway!). Looks like red spinifex. Wow, to the stove.

    Thank you for sharing the beauty of your country again, please keep it coming. "To infinity" ;-)

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    1. Thanks, Iris. I always leave behind everything I find (except for trash or mylar balloons I might come across!). I sell an occasional photo, but for me, it's just... I like taking pictures! Hiking and photography seem like the perfect combination.

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  12. Wow - lovely shots. Downhill is always worse than uphill.

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  13. I wish I could still do that--- Although I must admit that I feel like I did it along with you just from reading your posts. Well done!

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  14. The beauty of the desert is so stunning to look at. You really bring that home. There is a lot of people over her go round finding survey markers here on we call them Benchmarks, Have to admit to being one of them

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  15. Another wonderful hike and that sleeping face is indeed a really sleeping face. Very nice.

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  16. as usual, all your photos are gorgeous but I am stuck mentally on that old little marker - makes me wonder how often one was planted in the ground and what did it signify - fascinating

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  17. Beautiful captures and a historic find of the survey marker!

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  18. Enjoyed the post. Great photos

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  19. Such fantastic photos and so many interesting finds out there!

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  20. One step at a time is excellent advice, but the brain can get a little fuzzy late in the going. Water breaks!

    I'm fascinated by the marker.

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  21. Glad that you took 'one step at a time' and look at the wonderful photos you captured when you did stop ~ The light on the barrel is a very creative shot! ~ Another great adventure with you ~ thanks ~ Happy Weekend to you ~ Xo

    Living moment by moment,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  22. Pretty impressive hike no matter what. I love how you always find the coolest stuff. One idea about the marker: might be "section" (or something like that) 14 on one side, 13 on the other. My late Dad, who would have been 100 this year (only made it to 83) would have been able to tell you. Anyway, great photos as always. I'd like to take some of our rain and dump it on y'all, but that'd go and ruin the desert.

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    1. Exactly correct!! I had a nice reader email me, and here is what he said: "I believe it is a Section marker, part of the Township and Range survey system used to mark out land, mostly in the West. I believe the S14 | S13 to be the dividing line between Section 14 & Section 13. You can Google "Township and Range" and come up with a good explanation of how this worked." Also, see MYSTERY CABIN OWNER (below) who knows this area better than anyone. I would gladly take your rain!

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  23. Impressive hike. It's a longer fall if you are going downhill. Heat is my great enemy, so I get our an hour before sunrise almost every morning. However I only cover about 3 miles in about 3 hours of plodding on flat land and stopping to take photos or just take in the sunrise.

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  24. I really enjoyed this "back from the hike" because of all the miscellaneous finds - the marker, the stove, the (scavenger birds? yikes) and the sleeping rock. I wouldn't have the stamina to do this even in the best of weather - kudos to you!

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  25. You find the best stuff . . . thank you for sharing your adventures and all the tidbits along the way. I'm awestruck. 💙

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  26. Another wonderful adventure, great photos and sights. Thanks for taking us along.

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  27. MysteryCabinOwnerMay 28, 2021 at 4:19 PM

    The survey marker is for the USGS topo maps that everyone used to use. The slash is the dividing line between section 13 and section 14. On a topo map at the hash lines a darkened red mark was where a marker was placed. I think that the area was mapped in 1936 for the original 15min maps.

    Nice stove. I remember using that...

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    1. Thanks, Steve. I've seen those red marks on topo maps but wasn't sure what they were. Ya, that's a cool old stove. It looked nice in the late afternoon light.

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  28. Unique shots. As always we enjoy the pictures. Finally I will be hitting the trail, this time taking a 100 mile hunk of the Appalachian Trail.
    This is a test hike if I make the 100 miles I plan to try the 2279 miles next year. You are an inspiration, I just wish I could take the pictures you do. Your eye is a great camera.
    Sherry & jack, getting me ready to head out this Sunday!

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    1. Wow Jack, that's awesome! Good luck on your test hike. I know you will do great!

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  29. Aach! You reminded me of how I forgot to look for the USGS marker on Blackrock Mountain when I visited there last weekend.

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  30. Great shots with the low, slanting light. Your right about the majority of falls happening towards the end of walks. When I was a walks leader the company I worked for did some research into the matter. The other place where injuries frequently occurred was as groups set off back down having climbed a summit.

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  31. Another great hike. Yes, I can see the sleeping rock and the bird stick. At first look, the survey marker looks like a giant nail. Interesting find. Beautiful shadow and golden sunset shots. Have a happy weekend.

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  32. Those last two shots are gorgeous! Actually, I enjoyed all of the photos. That was quite an impressive hike no matter which GPS you use.

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  33. The light in these shots is stunning SPP 💛 Couldn't agree more that the end of a hike is so much more accident likely, I usually end up using a stick for added help ✨

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  34. The back lighting of the sun make these trees look so painterly! Yeah, easy does it! On step at a time:) Jesh

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  35. Wow, those photos are so amazing! Thanks for sharing them!

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  36. I love the photos with the Joshua Trees in them - the time of day was perfect. Quite a hike you had there. It's interesting comparing your gadgets data.

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  37. Yeah, I don't take many photos at the end of a hike. Too tired. Glorious glow!

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  38. Definitely go with the Garmin -- I'm sure you worked that hard at least. ... that is not just a bird stick in that one photo, it is most specifically a road-runner stick! ... nice photos all and I'm glad they made you stop and rest if only for a few moments each. That was interesting to know about downhill injuries -- makes perfect sense, but I never thought about it before. There's a little hill (for you it would be a slight rise) that we used to hike and back when I wore bifocals, coming down was scary. I used a walking stick.

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  39. Interesting hike from the mine and I am GLAD you made it out alright
    MB

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  40. me gustán mucho las fotos que has sacado del atardecer. Es el mejor momento para fotografíar y no siempre puedes hacerlo.

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  41. Interesting formations of trees.

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